Saturday, February 11, 2017

School Stories - Build a Light

We had a visioning summit at school today.  The participants were students, parents, teachers, alumni, parents with kids who graduated, community members and hangers-on.  It sounds deathly.  It wasn't.  One of the exercises was to craft a story based on the question "What does school look like when it is at its best?"   This was my story.

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"Stories are what we live in" wrote Kerwin Klein.  This is a story to live in.  It is a story of twins, a boy and a girl.  When they were very little they were afraid of the dark.   But soon enough, they put their night light away and started school.  At school, they learned to love learning.  The learned to love being outside and the learned to love tools.  Not just hammers and saws (although of course, hammers and saws) but all the tools.  They loved designing and coding with computers.  They loved logic and rhetoric and persuasion, the tools of argument.  They loved the woods and the city and it's people and all the different things the woods, and the city and the people could teach them.  The loved the tools of science:  microscopes, and magnifying glasses, and statistics.  And most of all they loved the tools of friendship:  love, communication, and the courage to tell their friends when they're wrong or even worse, when they were obnoxiously right.

When they got older, there were new challenges and terrors.  They were afraid about college, and new people, new places, and challenges of the wider world.  They worried about their futures, and the futures of their city, their country, and their planet.  But the learned to act on their fears and use their tools.  They looked at the darkness and were no longer afraid but thought about how to make a light.  And then with their friends, they built lights.  Some lights were little and only shined on their desks.  Some lights were big enough to light their homes and their dorm rooms as they left for college, and their first apartments.  And some lights, the lights they built with others, were big enough to shine on the whole world.

*                                                        *                                                            *

What does the light you want to build look like? 

Friday, January 20, 2017

Rome Simulation!

Oh BTW, we just finished a simulation in World 9 class.  It took 2 days.  People in the class were composite characters or groups (Julius a general, his army, the urban poor of Rome, etc. etc.).  The simulation culminated in a huge battle (with dice) wherein the Parthian King and his army was backing a class of rich landowners and Senators who had armed the urban poor of Rome and Alexandria and turned them over to the General Julius.  (The Urban Poor armies got -1 on dice rolls for being untrained).  Meanwhile, Cleopatra, the Soca, the High Priest of Rome, Julius' army (having defected), Antony, his army and a Senator who had been captured by Julius but freed by the Antony - Cleopatra coalition were aligned against them.  The merchants and a few other groups sat things out.  After the carnage, the Parthian King died on the battlefield as did Cleopatra.  Antony was on the run without an army and his Senatorial ally was dead.  One of the Senators got himself declared tyrant immediately before the battle and was busy giving out land afterwards.  It's unclear whether Julius was content with being the most powerful general or whether she was going to lead the troops against the Senate.  The Senator who declared himself tyrant played a very patient waiting game.  After the first day, he'd done almost nothing.  Most of the action involved Antony and Julius jockeying for power by allying with Cleopatra and the Parthian King, respectively.  

One of the more interesting outcomes of this iteration was that the merchants were constant targets but nobody actually got around to attacking them directly. 

Two days well spent making the point that it took money, land, and armies to rule Rome and those resources had to come from somewhere usually via expansion.  

More Market Revolution! When visuals are visual!

This is the second in a series on student projects related to the Market Revolution.  The first is here

The first project I talked about was way off rubric.  The one I'm talking about today is more typical.  Here is the project: 


You can see the five categories she chose:  economy, workplace, westward expansion, reform and gender are the same as the last examples but here the presentation is very different.  Each category gets a part of the circle and then interconnections are explained via lines and text.   The final copy that was graded was printed at school on a commercial grade poster printer on glossy paper.  It's poster-board size and is currently hanging in my room.

One of the things that you might not get is that this student is using two deep references to make this work.  First, she references Eastern State Penitentiary (a panopticon!), with the star-shape.  But there's also a nod here towards early notions of moral reform.  Specifically, the image "Keep Within the Compass"  that we looked at in class during a unit on Republican Motherhood.
 

This student is hoping to fix some errors in her original and then possibly market it for classroom use.  Although interested in history she is hoping to pursue a graphic design career.  However, as her work analyzed in this post shows, doing one thing doesn't mean not doing the other.    Tomrrow's post will be about the three game projects that students designed.  

Thursday, January 19, 2017

Market Revolution Projects #1 Bonus Tracks!

In most of our history work throughout the Upper School, we only deal with three categories of analysis* at the most at any one time.   For example, in an essay on the effects of the Mexican War on the coming of the Civil War the students might look at changing ideology around labor and the ways that ideology affected political parties and sectional divisions.  That's three categories that a student might deal with.   To move students past formulas of identity, get them used to seeing the complexity of the past, and see the interconnections between categories of analysis rather than just seeing them as separate things, I developed the Market Revolution Project.   The Project asks them to work with five categories of analysis and show the inter-relations between them while using primarily visual means. 

While my college prep students loved the assignment and often did quite well with it, my Honors students were frustrated.  The instructions are intentionally vague to promote creativity and the rubric is vague so that it's hard to work to the rubric and get an A.  Instead, the project rewards depth of knowledge, creativity, and the ability to see connections among a mountain of evidence.  (I've included the project directions below the note).  Over the next couple of days, I'll be posting examples of students who took different approaches to the project and explaining what's good about their work.

First up is a project that wasn't particularly visual.  It's a track list for a 5 CD set called "The Market Revolution".  Here are the tracks and I've added the categories of analysis the student used in each imagined CD:
Disc 1 Economy
  1. Inflation Nation by BUS
  2. Who Gave You the Right (to Charter Banks) by We the People
  3. The BUS is After Us by We the People
  4. Special Thanks to My Banks by Economy
  5. It’s Going Down by Paper Dollar Value

Disc 2 The Workplace
  1. Wheat Farmer to White Collar by Joe Schmoe
  2. See You in the Mills by Working Women
  3. Outside My Separate Sphere by Working Women
  4. Wage Rage by The Strikers
  5. Home is Where the Heart Is, Not the Workplace by The Mills

Disc 3 Gender Ideals
  1. God-Fearing Child-Rearing Dirt-Clearing Women by Separate Spheres
  2. Women of Virtue by Separate Spheres
  3. The Might of Men by Separate Spheres
  4. A Man Born to Lead by Separate Spheres
  5. It Boils Down to Nature by Separate Spheres

Disc 4 Reform
  1. BYOB by Bad Temperance
  2. Rehab by Asylum
  3. Ain’t No Way to Live by Union
  4. How Do You Spell That? by The Illiterates
  5. Celibacy or Bust by How Not to Die

Disc 5 Westward Expansion
  1. Manifest Destiny by Soulsearching
  2. Gold Rush by The Poor and Ambitious
  3. Heading West by The Cash Crops
  4. We Were Here First by The Native Americans
  5. Grass by Megafauna

 
 

You can see the interconnections in the way that she combined song titles with group names.  Also, she made a real CD with 13 tracks  on it.  This was the best one.

Actually all of them were that one.  



NB: Category of analysis is the lens through which you view the problem.  Typically students want to use social, economic, political and the left is often accused of only being interested in race, class, and gender.  What this should tell you is that there are NO STABLE CATEGORIES OF ANALYSIS.  Social groups might be a category but race, class and gender are all separate categories within social (and class is both social and economic).  Students should get to the point that they can start creating their own categories of analysis just by looking for commonalities in evidence. 

THE ASSIGNMENT


The Market Revolution Era                                                                Due:  Dec. 3rd

The goal:  To represent your knowledge of the changes that occurred during the market revolution and show how they are inter-related. 

The task:  To create a visual representation of life during the market revolution era.  The visual may be a drawing, a cartoon, a comic strip, an idea map, or another visual (check with me). 

Content:
Your visual must include information about the economy (the rise of the market, money, banks) as well as four of the following categories for a total of five categories.

·      the workplace (who does work, where, how)

·      gender ideals

·      politics/political parties

·      sectional identity

·      racial identity

·      reform movements

·      westward expansion

Reminder:  The best visuals will illustrate the inter-relationship among these phenomena.

You may have one visual or a series of visuals. 

Evaluation:

Content will be graded for each category based on the depth of knowledge demonstrated   Content will also be graded for showing interconnections across categories. 

You will also be graded on creativity, polish, and grammar and/or spelling.

Thursday, January 12, 2017

50,000! (NB: Numbers no longer reliable).

Crossed the 50,000 page views mark.   Sadly, it's due mostly to a huge uptick in Russian spambot hits.  But hey, at least I'm on their radar now! 

Wednesday, December 21, 2016

More on turnitin.



So this story got me thinking about turnitin again. Plus Russel Arben Fox asked me to blog about it again.  So I guess I will.


In the above linked story, a Latina student was accused of plagiarism because her instructor didn't believe she could use big, fancy words.   The instructor just knew that the student didn't write the paper.  The comments section on the facebook feed I got the story from was filled with faculty and graduate students of color, all of whom had similar stories.  It was pretty depressing.  As I've pointed out before, using turnitin for all my students helps them avoid plagiarism because I allow them to see their match scores and correct any problems.  But it helps me avoid prejudgement about my students as well.   When I use turnitin, I don't make assumptions about which students are more likely to plagiarize and which are not.  I've always tried to grade blind, which I can't do in turnitin (could you guys add that feature?), but I can at least treat all my students fairly.